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Website Design Tips That Can Help Your Ranking

Website Design Tips That Can Help Your Ranking

by Web Designer

Whenever you think of website design, you are probably considering how a website looks on the outside. If you are an HTML programmer, you might think that this refers to the programming that is used to create the site that we all see. In reality, website design also refers to a type of optimization technique that can help you improve your ranking on the search engines. Although this may seem far-fetched, it is actually something that many entrepreneurs on the Internet implement with their websites and blogs so that higher rankings can be achieved and more money can be made. In this article, we will discuss certain website design techniques that will boost your rankings and improve your overall sales throughout the month.

Most website design tips will tell you to present a website that looks professional. This usually involves quite a bit of graphics, and also a professional appearance to the website itself. This is often much easier to achieve when using a WordPress blog, simply because all you have to do is change themes in order to get a different appearance. When it comes to SEO and optimizing your website, one of the best things you can do is pay attention to how your website looks if you want to rank well in the SEs. One of the easiest ways to do this is by designing your website to present the advertisements for your products in a way that motivates people to click and potentiallyWeb Design buy.

If you think about popular websites today, like Yahoo! and CNN, they position their advertisements in specific locations that the visitor will more than likely be looking at. Most people are conditioned to expect advertisements, but even better, they are conditioned to look at certain areas of a website, which is where the webmasters typically place the ads. This conditioning motivates people to take notice, click, and see what they have to offer. Unfortunately, this website design tip is only focused upon garnering clicks and potential sales. The best tip to take away from this article has to do with improving your ranking on the search engines.

The easiest way that you can improve your ranking on any of the search engines is to choose a web design that loads extremely fast. The faster your site is able to load, the more valuable the site will be in the eyes of Google and other search engines. They are thinking about customer satisfaction, or at least visitor satisfaction, specifically those using their search engine to find the information. If the website is slow, people will more than likely click away, and never see what is offered. They will also be unsatisfied with their experience, something that search engines try to avoid.

Therefore, to improve your overall ranking with website design, the best thing you can do is use an HTML template or a WP theme that will load extremely quickly. As long as the information presented is relevant to the search, and you place your ads in appropriate locations, this tip will help you rank better and hopefully also help you earn more money.

Don’t Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (3rd Edition) (Voices That Matter)

Don't Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (3rd Edition) (Voices That Matter)

Since Don't Make Me Think was first published in 2000, hundreds of thousands of Web designers and developers have relied on usability guru Steve Krug's guide to help them understand the principles of intuitive navigation and information design. Witty, commonsensical, and eminently practical, it's one of the best-loved and most recommended books on the subject.

Now Steve returns with fresh perspective to reexamine the principles that made Don't Make Me Think a classic-with updat

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Comments

    • Mary Wendell
    • February 18, 2015
    Reply
    33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    New & Improved!, January 3, 2014
    By

    This review is from: Don’t Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (3rd Edition) (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
    There has been a noticeable shift in technology design – it’s all about us – the users! In light of this change, Steve Krug has updated his bestselling guide to web usability. As he says himself, “The basic principles are the same even if the landscape has changed, because usability is about people and how they understand and use things, not about technology. And while technology often changes quickly, people change very slowly.”

    His core common sense approach remains the same, but with all the new devices that people are interacting with these days, the competitiveness of a product relies on how easy it is to use. You could pay for a professional like Krug to determine how usable your product is, if you can afford it. But even then, it’s important to learn the principles yourself so you know whether the person you hire is considering and addressing the right issues. Happily, this book practices what it preaches, it’s written in a friendly chatty way and well designed. In short, this great book goes down easy.

    I’ve come across a lot of design books in my time and several in my last year while pursuing a higher education in graphic design – involving a personal favorite The Practice of Creativity: A Manual for Dynamic Group Problem-Solving, which Krug strongly endorses in a previous edition’s “Recommended Reading”. It would have been so great to have this book at my disposal while I was studying website design because the information is so well organized. For my classes I was provided Peachpit software books, which I found a little hard to follow for being too text heavy. If you are going to educate on design principles, you should follow similar rhetoric. Krug’s book organizes information in color, in tables, and often have entertaining illustrations.

    These new chapters make the new book a must-buy:

    Chapter 7 – Big Bang Theory of Web Design
    Chapter 10 – Mobile: It’s Not Just a City in Alabama
    Chapter 13 – Guide for the Perplexed: Making usability happen when you live

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    • Melissa Eggleston
    • February 18, 2015
    Reply
    21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    3 Hour Read Full of Useful Information and Practical Tips, January 17, 2014
    By
    Melissa Eggleston (Durham, North Carolina) –

    This review is from: Don’t Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (3rd Edition) (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
    I read the book pretty fast, as I knew I would since the first one was a quick read as well. I’ve been waiting for it to come, especially since I had to speak at a tech conference a few weeks ago on “What We Know About Your Website Users.”

    I read it in three chunks, 30 minutes, then 1 hour on the treadmill walking and another hour on the treadmill today. I nearly injured myself only once when I dropped the book. So, in 3 hours or less, someone can learn a lot of important issues to consider about the making or redesign of a website!

    I’m familiar with the older edition as it was required reading in grad school. Friends regularly ask me to look at their sites and usually the suggestions I make for improvement originate from usability guidelines in this book. Sometimes I get them to go buy it, and they come back to me with gratitude.

    It’s especially a great book for small business owners and soloprenuers who can’t spend much money for web help. It would also be very helpful for anyone thinking about doing mobile usability testing – he covers the issues and challenges with that.

    I really like the updated examples in this edition – they are great. Generally I felt like I had learned most, not all, of the information from the first book and that class in grad school. However, I by no means remember to use all the principles so it was great to review and think about things I need to change on my own website and for the sites I’m in the process of making now for others.

    The mobile chapter was really what I was eager to see to learn some new things. I wanted an easy answer like “responsive is the way to go!” – and, understandably, that’s not what’s there since its about tradeoffs and not black and white (darn it!). But Krug did really raise my awareness of mobile design choices. For example, being conscious about the use of flat design and not just doing it because it is trendy, making sure buttons are still clear, etc. He hits on affordances/visual signals. Terrific mobile examples as well.

    I wanted more on mobile, but I understand technology is in flux right now so we’ll have to see how it all plays out. Krug does make some comments about the mobile first movement and responsive design.

    (Hey Steve Krug, maybe you could write an entire book just about mobile usability? I’d buy it!)

    The footnotes made me laugh or smile. I like the personal nature they give the book. Also the photos, tables, cartoons, and illustrations break up the text and make it more manageable. I like that I can pick up the book, flip to a page and read a chunk of info that I may be able to use immediately – like the advice around breadcrumbs.

    I particularly liked Chapter 11 “Usability as Common Courtesy.”

    All in all, I find Krug to be very giving with information and resources. The jimmy rigging of a camera setup for $30 for mobile usability testing is an example.

    Krug makes usability accessible for regular folks. This also should make us more responsible for considering users when making websites.

    I know the websites I make will be better because I read this book.

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    • Denis Vukosav
    • February 18, 2015
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    16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Most usable book about web usability in 3rd edition, interesting and useful to read, January 17, 2014
    By

    Steve Krug is back with 3rd edition of “Don’t Make Me Think”, a bit different web design book than readers are used to find on the market.

    It all starts with the misleading title because after reading it you will certainly spend some time thinking about ideas presented inside, about quality improve quality of web site you already have or creating a new one using numerous tips author provided.
    For the most part this book is actually more a presentation and a picture book than the usual design book but it’s great because using pictures and examples of what is good and what is not the author is sending best messages.

    Therefore, you can be sure that after reading/viewing it you’ll have at least several new ideas how to improve usability of your website understanding your user better – what they like and what they don’t and how the regular user is browsing through the Internet.
    Web usability is feature about many web designers don’t think enough or not at all resulting in websites that are maybe nice or full of information but unusable.

    Although his previous edition was published almost 8 years ago, it was still the recommended read for any web designer or enthusiast, to learn some useful tricks and get some tips for making or upgrading good website.
    But as author said the world and Internet have changed a lot, due to the technology rapid development, the web itself kept improving and usability became mandate, not an advantage. But most importantly his previous edition felt dated.
    Therefore Krug went throughout the book, updated all the information, deleted what belongs to the past and added three completely new chapters – Big Bang Theory of Web Design, Mobile: It's Not Just a City in Alabama and Guide for the Perplexed: Making usability happen when you live. The obtained result not only justifies a new edition, but certainly would become the new standard for the next few years in terms of web usability.

    The book starts with introducing of several guiding principles, followed by design patterns and tools that would be helpful for improving website efficiency. Throughout the book the author still insists on usability testing and book excels on this field due to many examples that are illustrating where and how the actual websites were enhanced.
    Steve Krug insists on simplicity and his advices are clear as soon as you read them such as "...It should be very clear what is clickable" or "...get rid of half the words, then get rid of half of what’s left", or his famous “Trunk test” – if you’ve been blindfolded and locked in a car trunk, you should be able to answer several questions about a site immediately when your blindfold is removed.
    Using numerous examples with existing websites author is going beyond just design issues, discussing other elements needed to make a usable and pleasant site for browsing.

    So if you’ve previously read this fantastic manual purchase of new edition can be definitely recommend due to useful and numerous updates, and if didn't you can be sure that this is one of the top five books on web design topic that you will ever read. In addition to being endlessly informative, thanks to the charm of the author it’s also funny and easy to read that makes you read it from cover to cover.

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