Proper Search Engine Ettiquette

Proper Search Engine Ettiquette

Many people want to know more about SEO. Are you one of them? If so, you might find the following article helpful in your search for information. We hope you find some useful pointers.

Increase Revenue with the Help of SEO

Backlinks

You can spend weeks designing the most amazing website the world has ever seen, packing it with tons of useful information and adding interactive features. Unfortunately, if no one knows about the site, it will have all been for nothing. Getting people to your site is the job of the search engines. Getting the search engines to recognize your great site is where proper search engine optimization comes into play.

Engine

The first step in designing an effective SEO program is figuring out what it is people search for when they are looking for the things your site offers. If your site is about scuba diving in Florida, you need to concentrate on the terms people use to search for this. “Scuba diving in Florida” is a safe but if that’s the only term you concentrate on, you are limiting yourself. Google offers a great set of tools to help you determine how people search for various things. >

When it comes to your site’s content, the content must be relevant to the search terms that direct people to the site. If people arrive expecting to see one thing and do not find it, they will leave and never return. This will harm your search engine rankings and make it more difficult for your desired visitors to find the site. In other words, if your site focuses on SCUBA, don’t try to attract visitors looking for fishing in Florida. Keep the SEO relevant to the content.

Ettiquette

The organization of your website is very important when it comes to how the search engines rank you. A site with a proper hierarchy looks more professional and useful. To aid the search engines in seeing this, make sure your site includes a detailed site map. Also, use anchor text to create links within your site. This helps visitors navigate your site and the search engines will recognize this effort.

Helpful Service

Like many things, you can probably do SEO by yourself, but the pros can do it better and quicker. SEO experts can increase your rankings quickly while it might take you weeks or months to see the same results. SEO is also a dynamic process that changes often and it’s the pros’ job to stay on top of these trends. For most beginners who really want to drive traffic to the site, an expert is the best option, at least initially.

Html Coding

Once you initiate your SEO program, you have to be able to measure the results. Without analyzing the results, you won’t know if the plan in working or how well it is working.There are several companies that will help you with this. Once again, this is where the experts have the advantage.

Media Accounts

Search engine optimization is a complicated process that is constantly changing. Unfortunately it cannot be ignored. If you care enough to build a quality website, make it worthwhile by carefully using effective SEO techniques to get your page recognized and drive traffic to your site. Keep up with the latest trends and techniques and your site will grow.

If you want to know more about the subject, you may click on the resources to lead you to more information. You may also use the search box to further lead you to other articles. If you want to contribute to this website, we would love to hear your suggestions! It would be great to have you share your thoughts about the subject. Feel free to send an email to us.

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Comments

    • Just Me
    • December 20, 2013
    Reply

    Do You Need To Be Certified In Scuba Diving In Order To Go Diving? My husband and I are interested in scuba diving when we take a trip to Florida. Although we are both good swimmers and frequently snorkel, we have never tried scuba diving. We have looked in to taking classes and they are very pricey. To get certified in our city, it will cost us $500 and that does not include equipment. I think it is a little pricey especially since we might shell out all the money and not enjoy it as much as snorkeling. I see scuba diving excursions in Florida all the time, do you have to be certified to go on a beginner dive? Can we take a dive excursion that offers not certification but a quick beginner lesson before going out? My husbands ready to sign up for the certification classes but I’d prefer to try it out first. Any advice appreciated

    View Comment
      • Admin
      • December 20, 2013
      Reply

      Scuba diving is a funny thing: No, you don’t have to be legally certified (no government agency is going to arrest you for diving without certification), but no dive shop will let you sign up for a dive, rent equipment, or get air fills without a certification card. The diving industry is pretty self regulating like that.

      A “Discover Scuba” course sounds perfect for you! Basically, they will take you on a short dive, after a pool session and some brief classroom work. It’s a fantastic opportunity to see if scuba diving is for you, before you shell out the $500 for the certification course.

      Another option might be PADI’s Scuba Diver course. It’s a shortened form of the standard Openwater certification course, and is designed for divers who intend to dive only occasionally on vacation. It allows you to dive only under the direct supervison of an instructor and only to fairly shallow depths. This course tends to be cheaper than full certification, and takes less time, too.

      Hope this helps!

      View Comment
    • Michelle
    • December 31, 2013
    Reply

    How Much Money Can I Make As A Scuba Instructor In Hawaii? My parents have a place in Florida that they only use a few months out of the year. I plan on moving there, getting certified as an advanced scuba diver, then as a scuba instructor. However, it’s always been my dream to move to Hawaii. If I worked as a dive instructor in Florida until I saved enough money to buy a house in Hawaii, I could move there and start working with local shops as an instructor.

    I know Hawaii is a very expensive place to live, but being that it a major tourist attraction, I think I can make a reasonable amount of money instructing there. But is it enough to live on?

    Just need a little help with the figures. How much are scuba instructors paid in Hawaii?

    View Comment
      • Admin
      • December 31, 2013
      Reply

      If you save enough to actually buy a house in Hawai’i on a Florida instructor’s pay…you might look at the difference between what that would but in Florida vs. Hawai’i. The median house price here now is over $600K and it is expected to rise to $1 million for a MEDIAN price by 2020, just 6 years. Unless you are the dive shop owner, you cannot earn enough to pay or even qualify for a mortgage. If you are fluent in Japanese you can make a little more money but not much. You have to pay for your own instructor’s liability insurance ($600 a year). Most of the instructors I know barely break even.

      View Comment
    • Bridgett
    • January 3, 2014
    Reply

    Will I Get In Trouble For Sneaking Out Of My House And Going On A Road Trip? My best friend and I are currently grounded until the end of time
    we’re sick of being locked up, so we’re planning a little getaway
    we’re probably going to go all around Florida, stopping to parasail and scuba dive. We wouldn’t be gone very long, but could we get into trouble?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      You’re not very bright, are you?

      To be honest, this would be a very BAD idea. Like, seriously bad idea. Especially when you’re grounded. Your parents will not be happy and when they notice you are gone, they’ll freak out. Call the cops, file a missing child/runaway report. Not good.

      Just wait it out. You’ll be fine.

      View Comment
    • Justin S
    • February 6, 2014
    Reply

    BEST PLACES TO SCUBA DIVE? Where is the best places to SCUBA dive in the Caribbean?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      FLORIDA KEYS
      must see-
      molasses reef
      christ of the deep statue
      adolphus busch sr wreck
      bad-
      crowded
      long drive to western sites
      dives-
      long reef, the wall, turtle rocks, carysfort reef, grecian rocks, davis reef, eagle, samanthas reef, sombrero reef, looe key, adolphus busch sr, sand key reef, joe’s tug, molasses reef, christ of the deep statue
      LITTLE BAHAMA BANK
      must see-
      spotted dolphins (snorkling)
      bad-
      often rough
      might not see dolphins
      some remote sites
      diving is expensive
      snorkling-
      dolphin encounter
      dives-
      shark junction, sugar wreck, the bull pit, shark rodeo
      TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
      must see-
      northwest point
      grand turk walls
      bad-
      sea conditions easily disrupt boat trips to dive sites
      dives-
      grace bay, northwest point, the tunnels, the amphitheater, west caicos, football field, eagle ray pass, hole in the wall, driveway, whiteface
      ISLA DE LA JUVENTUD
      must see-
      tarpon
      bad-
      some tourist facilities are unpredictable
      dives-
      shark valley, the queen’s garden, cabo frances reef, cabo frances to point pedernales
      CAYMAN ISLANDS
      must see-
      stingray city
      bad-
      expensive
      crowded
      dives-
      stingray city, bloody bay wall, ghost mountain, eagle ray pass, coral gardens, smith’s cove, jackson pointe, mv captain keith tibbets
      COZUMEL AND THE YUCATAN
      must see-
      palancar reef
      cenotes
      bad-
      busy
      dives-
      palancar reef, C58 general anaya, cenotes, san juan reef, paradise reef, tormentos, san francisco wall, maracaibo reef
      BELIZE
      must see-
      blue hole
      the elbow
      bad-
      hurricanes midsummer
      reefs are offshore
      snorkling-
      shark ray alley
      dives-
      blue hole, the elbow, caye chapel, laughing bird caye, sapodilla caye, the sayonara, long caye wall, glovers reef

      View Comment
    • Mr. LOL
    • February 27, 2014
    Reply

    Good Place In Florida To Snorkel And Dive? Me and a friend of mine are thinking of going to Florida in September for about a week to snorkel (me) and scuba dive (him).

    Where would be a good place to do this. We prefer to stay in seaside condo. or a hotel.

    Thanks.

    View Comment
      • Admin
      • February 27, 2014
      Reply

      The Florida Keys has the best scuba diving in Florida. I don’t know if that’s where you’re going, but that’s the best place for scuba diving.
      Here is a great link to Florida Keys scuba diving:
      http://www.florida-scubadiving.com

      Miami is a great spot for scuba diving, too. Here is a link for you with recommendations on where to scuba and which tour companies to go with:
      http://www.destination360.com/north-america/us/florida/miami-scuba-diving.php

      As for snorkeling, you’ve got plenty more options. I found a link to a website that lists some great snorkeling locations across the state of Florida.
      http://www.gonesnorkeling.com/destinations/florida-snorkeling.asp

      I highly recommend a visit to Caladesi Island State Park if you are visiting the Clearwater/Tampa Bay Area. It’s mentioned as a good place to snorkel, and it is a beautiful beach. I was there in January and enjoyed it very much. I had to take a ferry to the island, because no cars are allowed. It’s a very clean, beautiful white sand beach.

      View Comment
    • Vinny
    • March 5, 2014
    Reply

    What Is The Best Value Scuba Diving Program In The World? I would like to start a career in diving. I’m not interested in the amateur diving courses. I’m talking about PADI certification that will allow me to get a job as a diver. I’ve looked at some programs in Thailand that look pretty good. Some of the programs were over 6 months long! That’s no problem with me. I want a program that is very thorough that will give me good employment opportunities when I finish the program. I’ve worked in Thailand before so I’m familiar with the culture and people. The cost of living is pretty low, which would save me lots of money.

    Thailand was just one of many places in the world to get PADI certification. I’ve also though Jamaica would be a good option. The cost of living is probably also low in Jamaica, but I haven’t really looked into it.
    By the way, I don’t have any scuba experience.

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      The advantage of a PADI certification is that it’s the most recognized in the world. In other words: it will increase your ability to get a job. You’ll find a PADI dive center in almost every corner of the world. Also, other agencies will allow a PADI Instructor to cross over with little additional training. PADI, on the other hand, requires instructors from other agencies (SDI, SSI) to go through the full instructor development course. I think that tells you a lot about who has the highest quality program.

      Regarding the timeline: six months is the absolute minimum it will take you to become a scuba instructor – I think that’s a standard worldwide. You must have at least 100 dives to start an instructor program, and while you’ll accumulate a few dozen through training, there are still a lot you’ll need to log on your own or while working as a divemaster (the step before becoming a scuba instructor).

      Regarding where to get trained – it sounds like you have a good perspective on this. The company with the cheapest price or shortest program isn’t necessarily the best. This is nothing against Thailand, but I went to one of their instructor farms and had one of the worst dives of my life. My guide was a divemaster who, four months prior, had never been diving. Yikes, I would never hire this guy.

      Before choosing what instructor school to go to, I’d consider where you want to end up. Locations like Thailand, Florida or the Caribbean lend themselves to doing tons and tons of intro dives. You’ll hold a lot of hands and deal with a lot of freaked out people who (in the end) usually relax and have a great time. Your instructor credentials also might be taken as seriously if you do all your training in the tropics. Folks in the industry tend to think that instructors who trained in tropical waters have it easy. Training in cold water or in an environment with some hazards like (surf entries in California, for example) make you a tougher more experienced instructor. Again, this depends on where you want to go with your dive career. If all you want to do is teach people in the tropics, you might as well learn to be an instructor where you’re going to end up teaching.

      Get your captain’s license and you’ll open up your job opportunities a lot more. There’s a place in Hawaii called Dive Oahu, that can help you knock out both of those.

      If you want a career in commercial diving, the Pacific NW is a good location. For Public Safety / Forensic Diving consider Malibu Divers in California.

      Whatever you decide, definitely ask about job placement opportunities and check those google reviews before putting money down. One last idea: the instructor exam fees will be around $500, so it’s important to pass the first time. Asking about the candidate “IE Success Rate” is would be smart as well.

      View Comment
    • Lizzy
    • May 8, 2014
    Reply

    Where Are Some Good Places To Scuba Dive? I haven’t been scuba diving in a year now and I’m going crazy. Where are some good spots to scuba dive around Florida. I’ve already been to vortex. I want a place where the visibilty is good and is any where from 15 to 85ft deep.

    Oh and how old do you have to be to get certified in nitrox. I can’t remember if it’s 18 or 16.

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Pennecamp park in the Florida keys is gerogeous. Been there before plenty of times. Lotsa fishies and reefs. Was nice, clear water when I went there last. : ) I havent been scuba diving for awhile as well. Floridia’s the best place for it.

      View Comment
    • Brad H
    • May 30, 2014
    Reply

    Scuba Diving Career Please Help? Well recently ive been looking into a suna diving career well i got a couple questions
    1.how much money does the average scuba diver make each year?
    2.what exactly do scuba divers do?
    3.how much does all your equipment cost?
    4.what do u need 2 have a career in this field (education)?
    5.how many years of skool do u need 2 have a scuba diving career?
    well that is all i have right now also well here is any info. u may need well im 13 (im asking cuz i wanna no wut classes i should take in high skool) i live in flint MI but plan of moving 2 florida or california or possibly hawaii but i have some interest in ausrallia cuz of the great barrier reef is there anything else i should no about this career field?? thanx a million!!

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Scuba is a very rewarding career choice in many ways.
      1. The amount made depends on several factors; what type of diving being done, amount of training required to complete the job and amount of local competition. If you work in a retail dive shop and can function in the many roles expect to make 30,000 – 50,000 per year. If you do salvage work the going rate in my area (Texas) is 200.00 to show up and for 1 hour after that 150.00 an hour to complete. There are commercial divers that work on oil rigs and other underwater sites that make well over 100,00 per year.
      2. things divers can do; teach , guide tourists, inspect dams and underwater structures, research and science, exploration and documentaries, photography, video and much more.
      3. A basic complete set of scuba gear might run anywhere from 1500.00 to over 3000.00.
      4. If your goal is to be a scuba instructor or guide I would recommend following the PADI program starting with Open Water and follow thru Master Scuba Diver Trainer to ensure the best chance at success and potential money earnings. If you are interested in commercial diving there are several excellent trade schools to learn the business of commercial diving.
      5. Your education could be as short as 1 year or more likely several years. I personally consider myself as always learning and taking classes to stay up to date with the latest trends.

      Try to pick up as much education as you can now. Some things that might be useful later on include; good understanding of science and physics, multiple languages is a huge plus learn spanish along with any other languages spoken in the region you might want to live. Having knowledge of engine repair can really come in handy and make the difference when competing for a job. Spend time on boats and lean how to handle them as well as the rules for water craft. Log the time you spend on boats in case you decide to get a captain’s license.

      Good luck with your pursuit of a diving career.

      View Comment
    • Wise_philip
    • May 31, 2014
    Reply

    Saftey Tips For Scuba Diving In The Florida Keys? Soon illbe going scuba diving in the fl. keys and itll be my first time diving what are some saftey tips for diving and being in the keys

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      I don’t know anything about a “Sonic Shark Repellent”.

      However, when you are diving in the Keys you should pay special attention to “current” and “wildlife”.

      Ocean currents can behave erratically when you are diving, especially around certain reefs. Just keep your “bearings” straight and you will be fine.

      DO NOT “handle” the wildlife. At some reef’s the fish and “wildlife” will be quite “friendly”. BE CAREFUL! Unless your qualified diving partner says its “OK” use the “LOOK BUT DON’T TOUCH” principle.( I don’t want you to lose a hand or finger.)

      DO NOT touch the reef it-self. It is “un-cool”( and even illegal on some reef’s), to “take a souvenir”. Be happy with the experience of “the dive”. Years ago my brother made the wrong decision to take some “cool looking red coral” as a souvenir. He wasn’t wearing gloves. His hands swelled up like a balloon. Apparently, it was “Fire Coral”,( that’s what our guide told us later).

      Just make sure ,when you are in the water, to be aware of your surroundings; don’t wear “flashy” watches or jewelry, and LISTEN TO YOUR GUIDE.

      Obviously, you will want to wear appropriate “gear”. And you should ALWAYS wear “booties” or “wet-shoes” when swimming,(coral can “eat” your feet up! Besides, you don’t want to “kick-up” a Ray!)

      You are going to have a blast! WISH I was going! Good Luck!

      View Comment

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