10 Fun Things to do With Beer (Besides Drinking It)

A Kranz (wreath) of K?lsch beer.

This post was inspired by an article I read called “For What Ales You”.

A bad pun is always worth repeating ?

1. Clean Copper Pots

I wish I could try this, but we haven’t owned a copper bottom pot for years.

Apparently, the mild acidity in beer is good for cleaning copper. Just pour a little bit into the pot, let it sit for a few minutes (maybe the amount of time it takes to finish off the rest of the beer), and wipe it out.

2. Add Shine to Your Hair

Boil (??) a cup of beer until it’s reduced down to 1/4 cup. Let it cool and add to your shampoo. It is supposed to add shine and luster to your hair.

3. Add Bounce to Your Hair

Now that you’ve washed your hair with beer, try using it as a conditioner. Add 3 tablespoons to a half cup water. Rub the beer solution into your freshly washed hair and let it sit for several minutes. Rinse and bounce.

Slug (BG)

4. Slugfest

Although I can’t personally vouch for numbers 1-3, I do know this works.

Garden slugs love beer. To kill the little buggers (or sluggers) – fill wide mouth jars or pie tins 1/3 full with beer. Place (or bury in the case of the jars) 15 to 20 feet away from your garden. The slugs will smell the beer, try to drink it, and fall into the containers and drown.

Talk about drowning in pleasure.

5. Sooth Tired Feet

Soak your tired dogs in an ice cold beer bath. The bubbly beer will sooth your feet.

6. Make a Beer Compass

Lost in the wilderness after drinking all that beer at a kegger? Don’t fret. Just let some of the beer go flat, magnetize a needle by rubbing it with silk, and float it on the flat beer. The needle will point north and south.

Of course, this assume you have any beer left, a needle, and some silk. But hey, why not?

English: Grass in a field.

7. Grow Grass

Not the medicinal kind, mind you.

Spray some beer – organic preferred – on brown patches in your lawn. The grass will enjoy the fermented sugars and start growing again. (Beer is recommended by many organic gardeners as a fertilizer ingredient).

8. Clean Your Wood

Hey. Get your mind out of the gutter.

Flat beer is an excellent wood furniture cleaner. Wipe on with one clean cloth, wipe off with another. (Ala Karate Kid).

9. Shine Your Gold

Pour beer onto a cloth and polish your gold jewelry. Avoid rubbing on gemstones. Wipe it clean with a dry towel and watch the gold shine!

(Uhmmm, maybe this is one you should do at your own risk).

10. Clean Your Bean

Huh? Oh wait, your coffee bean, that is.

Pour beer on a coffee stain in carpet, and rub it into the fibers. Supposedly, it will lift the coffee stain right out.

(Let’s try this one at your own risk, too).

So, there you have it. Beer has many uses besides drinking. So, the next time you have some leftover beer (is that possible?), you can entertain yourself until you sober up a bit.

Click here for reuse options!
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Comments

    • Anonymous
    • January 4, 2014
    Reply

    How Many Of You Know This? Ketchup works just as well to clean copper pot bottoms as it does (I can’t remember the name of the commercial paste).

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Makes sense, I’m sure it’s the acid in the tomatoes that helps it.

      View Comment
    • Rhawni
    • January 7, 2014
    Reply

    What Is The Best Cookware For Non-stick Cooking Without Teflon? I’m considering purchasing a durable cookware set and want the benefits of non-stick cooking but don’t want to use teflon. Some options I’ve looked at are anodized aluminum versus stainless steel or copper bottoms. Any suggestions?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Anodized aluminum layer is microthin and will eventually wear through, as will teflon. Well seasoned cast iron works really well, as does a seasoned steel wok. (Manufacturers explain how to season your pans and how to maintain them. It’s not hard.) But cast iron is heavy. The copper bottom on most pans is largely cosmetic, so it doesn’t help with heat distribution or non-stick anything.

      What matters is construction and design, not brand or marketing hype. Aluminum distributes heat very well, is cheap and lightweight. Sides of this pan also aluminum, meaning excess heat can escape up the sides. Anytime good heat conductor goes up sides of pan, it makes the cookware MUCH MORE FORGIVING, which means you can multitask with kids and a phone call and still not burn your food, probably.

      Heat distribution matters most for saucepans, next for skillets and saute pans, least for pots that you only boil water, pasta, or soup in. And not at all for things like colanders, that you don’t actually cook in.

      I like All-Clad type construction better because it has aluminum GOING UP THE SIDES OF THE PAN, HENCE MORE FORGIVING but the aluminum layer is sandwiched between layers of 18/10 stainless steel. Easier to see food color and doneness, no possibility of scratching through to aluminum in 20 years. Not non-stick, but easy to clean up after.

      Don’t buy overpriced All-Clad brand though. Similar construction available from Kitchen Aid 5 ply and Cuisinart Multi-Clad (I think) for less money. It’s important that the word “clad” be used to describe the cookware—means inner aluminum layer goes up the sides. It may be called Tri-ply or 5-ply. There should be a cross-section picture somewhere to brag how the aluminum goes up the side of the pan. No picture probably means it DOESN'T go up the sides of the pan. And sometimes there's a picture that clearly shows it doesn't go up the sides. It should be "18/10" stainless steel, which means it has the proper amount of chromium and nickel in the steel.

      Beware of pans that only have an aluminum or copper disk in the bottom of the pan. Far less forgiving and more likely to burn your food when you are multitasking. You should not be able to see the line of a disk on the pan.

      View Comment
    • Marbear
    • January 27, 2014
    Reply

    Do Personal Chefs Bring Their Own Pots Pans And Cookware? I want to become a personal chef/ caterer. I know caterers bring their own stuff but I want to cook in someones home for appetizer parties and meal replacements ( dinners) so do I need to bring my own pots and pans and cookware to their home or can I use theirs? What is the custom?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      It depends on you client. Some people want you to bring your own, others are more comfortable with their cookware, like not wanting non-stick or something. Some people can’t have foods cooked in copper for instance. So be ready to offer to bring your own and clean up at your own home, or be prepared for them to tell you to use their pots and pans, and clean up afterwards at their home.

      View Comment
    • TornadoTess
    • March 7, 2014
    Reply

    Cleaning Cookware? I have caliphon hard anodozed non-stick cookware and the out side looks nasty! I am used to copper bottom or stainless that you put a little cameo on it and it shines right up! How do I make it look nice again???

    I had the same stainless set for ten years and it still looked almost new!!

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Saw a chef do this on t.v. last week , but havnt tried it myself, but it cant hurt to try! He rubbed lemon juice all over very badly stained pots and then rubbed over that with salt, they came up spotless! Put the salt on a cloth and rub it in. I am going to try it when i burn something again .(Probably sooner rather than later!) Hope it works…cheers ?

      View Comment
    • Buttercup923
    • March 8, 2014
    Reply

    How Do You Clean Copper Jewelry? I have a couple of vintage copper cuff bracelets from the 60s – 70s & they are starting to tarnish. Does anyone know what would be good to clean them? Thanx!

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      You don’t have to have a store-bought cleaner, you can use things that can easily be found around the house in most any kitchen; vinegar, lemon juice, or ketchup! Test it out on a small area to make sure you get the result you are looking for. I find that for my copper pots, the best and fastest solution is anything tomato based, like tomato sauce, ketchup, tomato juice, etc. Sounds wierd, but it works like a charm.

      View Comment
    • Maryrother@ymail.com
    • March 11, 2014
    Reply

    How Do You Clean Copper Pots That Were Used On A Propane Stove.?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Put some coarse salt like rock salt or sea salt on a saucer, cut a lemon in half, dip one half of the lemon in the salt (cut side down), then scrub. It removes almost anything from a copper pot and the pot will glow when done.

      I guess limes work too from previous post.

      View Comment
    • Boycott Hollywd Commies
    • March 20, 2014
    Reply

    If I Have No Copper Cleaner, What Else Can I Use. Toothpaste?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      You will need the following:-

      * a pan or dish large enough to completely immerse the Copper pot in
      * aluminum foil to cover the bottom of the pan
      * enough water to fill the pan
      * a vessel in which to heat the water
      * hot pads or kitchen mitts with which to handle the heated water vessel
      * baking soda, about 1 cup per gallon of water

      Line the bottom of the pan with aluminum foil. Set the Copper object on top of the aluminum foil. Make sure the Copper touches the aluminum.

      Heat the water to boiling. Remove it from the heat and place it in a sink. To the hot water, add about one cup of baking soda for each gallon of water. (If you need only half a gallon of water, use half a cup of baking soda.) The mixture will froth a bit and may spill over; this is why you put it in the sink.

      Pour the hot baking soda and water mixture into the pan, and completely cover the Copper part of pot.

      Almost immediately, the tarnish will begin to disappear. If the copper is only lightly tarnished, all of the tarnish will disappear within several minutes. If the Copper is badly tarnished, you may need to reheat the baking soda and water mixture, and give it several treatments to remove all of the tarnish.

      View Comment
    • Laurie o
    • March 22, 2014
    Reply

    Hi I Need Help With My Copper Pans,I Would Like A Home Made Remedy For Cleaning The Copper Bottom?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Here are a few of home remedies for cleaning your copper pans that I have come across. Good luck

      Tools & Chemicals:
      Salt, lemon, scrubber or flour & white vinegar.

      Technique:

      To clean the bottom of copper bottomed pots and pans cover a freshly cut lemon with salt and scrub.

      Mix equal parts of flour, and salt with enough white vinegar to make a paste. Let mixture stand on the copper, then rinse.

      To polish use Catsup/ketchup. Be generous, scrub with a metal scrubbing pad, allow to sit for a few minutes, rinse and polish with a clean, dry cloth.

      View Comment
    • Anonymous
    • March 22, 2014
    Reply

    Is Vinegar Good For Cleaning Copper?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Too really bring up a shine on copper (especially copper bottom pots) use ketchup. Just wipe it on let it set a short while and rinse off, if you want more shine repeat the process. If you rub with a scouring pad the results happen much faster. Good luck!

      View Comment
    • Quigly99
    • April 2, 2014
    Reply

    I Let My Double Boiler Revereware Copper Pot Boil Dry & Inside Of Pot Is Discolored. How Do I Clean?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      The old home remedy for cleaning and brightening copper is to dip half a lemon in salt and scour with it. I’d try putting enough water in the bottom of the pan to cover the discoloration and add lemon juice to it. Let it simmer in the pot and see what happens, then finish with the salt and lemon bit. That should do the trick.

      View Comment
    • Gwendolyn
    • April 10, 2014
    Reply

    What Can U Use To Clean Grease Resudue From Bottom Of Pots/pans?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      My tiny Irish grandmother taught me this method a billion years ago and it works.
      If pot/pan is seriously gunked up with grease, and is small enough to fit inside a larger pot, kettle etc, Boil enough water and white vinegar (mixed 1/2 and 1/2) to completely cover the gunked up pot/pan (or boil the water and vinegar and pour into a sink or laundry tub) then submerge the icky pot in the water/vin. mixture. Let soak an hour or more and scrub, scour with baking soda and vinegar mixture. The vin and bkng soda will bubble up when combined but they release grease and you can scrape the cunk off easily. Some times you may need to scrape with a metal scraper or metal brush or a copper scrubby. Then, if necessary scrub the area with an SOS steel wool pad.
      This is also environmentally safe.

      View Comment
    • Jaso
    • April 11, 2014
    Reply

    I Recently Bought A Copper Bottom Pot & When I Put It On The Gas Range To Boil Water, The Copper Discolored.. ? I recently bought a copper bottom pot and when I boiled some water over high flame, the copper began to discolor, and by the time I was done, the copper had changed to rainbow colors. I don’t know why this happened, does anyone know how I can get the copper back to the original color? This is one of my most expensive pots..

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Copper will discolor with heat or time. That’s natural. Go to a hardware store and buy some copper cleaner like Brasso. It comes back perfectly.

      View Comment
    • JoAnn P
    • April 16, 2014
    Reply

    I Have A Very Old Copper Pot That Gets Really Grungy & Tarnished. What’s The Best Way To Clean/polish It Witho

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Try some Ketchup…:)

      The Heinz Solution for Copper Pots

      There are plenty of cleaners on the market for cleaning up your copper cookwear- but if you want to save a few bucks, be kind to the environment and don’t mind a little elbow grease, then head for the fridge and grab the ketchup! The acids in ketchup will eat tarnish up!

      Give your cookware a light coating and wait. (Depending on how tarnished we’re talking here, you’re looking at 5 minutes all the way up to 30 minutes.) Then rinse and dry!

      If you can’t wait, add a little salt to the mixture and lightly go over the surface- as not to scratch- with a soft rag. Rinse and dry.

      View Comment
    • Willow
    • April 19, 2014
    Reply

    How Do I Clean The Outside Of My Pots And Pans? I want to hang my pots and pans in my kitchen, but they look horrid on the outside. I tried Mr.Metal but I need something stronger or more abrasive. They are stainless steel with copper bottoms I think.

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Tarn-X works well on copper (if they have reddish bottoms, that’s definitely copper). It’s pretty smelly, but it does the job.

      View Comment
    • Laurie o
    • April 24, 2014
    Reply

    Hi I Need Help With My Copper Pans,I Would Like A Home Made Remedy For Cleaning The Copper Bottom?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Here are a few of home remedies for cleaning your copper pans that I have come across. Good luck

      Tools & Chemicals:
      Salt, lemon, scrubber or flour & white vinegar.

      Technique:

      To clean the bottom of copper bottomed pots and pans cover a freshly cut lemon with salt and scrub.

      Mix equal parts of flour, and salt with enough white vinegar to make a paste. Let mixture stand on the copper, then rinse.

      To polish use Catsup/ketchup. Be generous, scrub with a metal scrubbing pad, allow to sit for a few minutes, rinse and polish with a clean, dry cloth.

      View Comment
    • Laurie o
    • May 6, 2014
    Reply

    Hi I Need Help With My Copper Pans,I Would Like A Home Made Remedy For Cleaning The Copper Bottom?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Here are a few of home remedies for cleaning your copper pans that I have come across. Good luck

      Tools & Chemicals:
      Salt, lemon, scrubber or flour & white vinegar.

      Technique:

      To clean the bottom of copper bottomed pots and pans cover a freshly cut lemon with salt and scrub.

      Mix equal parts of flour, and salt with enough white vinegar to make a paste. Let mixture stand on the copper, then rinse.

      To polish use Catsup/ketchup. Be generous, scrub with a metal scrubbing pad, allow to sit for a few minutes, rinse and polish with a clean, dry cloth.

      View Comment
    • James D
    • May 12, 2014
    Reply

    How To Polish Copper Horn?

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      Use ketchup. To quickly clean copper pots, smear liberally with ketchup. The acids in the tomatoes and the vinegar will clean the copper. You’ll still need to use a polish for stains that don’t disappear. Rinse well and buff to dry.

      Or cut a lemon in half and dip it in table salt. Simply rub it on your copper. Voila! Copper is cleaned. Remember to put on a finish (like car wax) so that the copper does not corrode. This really works!

      View Comment
    • Sprabary1@sbcglobal.net
    • May 13, 2014
    Reply

    What Is The Best And Easiest Way To Clean The Built Up Grease And Grime From The Bottom Of Copper Pots? I had an old basic electric stove and the bottom of all my pots are just nasty with old burnt on grease and just ,age.now i have a new flat top stove and would like to clean the old pots.

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      You start by gently scrubbing with salt and vinegar. that will get rid of most of it. Then when you begin to see an improvement, switch over to cameo copper cleaner. It will be some elbow grease, but that will remind you in the future to polish each time thay are washed….good luck

      View Comment
    • Buttercup923
    • May 18, 2014
    Reply

    How Do You Clean Copper Jewelry? I have a couple of vintage copper cuff bracelets from the 60s – 70s & they are starting to tarnish. Does anyone know what would be good to clean them? Thanx!

    View Comment
    1. Reply

      You don’t have to have a store-bought cleaner, you can use things that can easily be found around the house in most any kitchen; vinegar, lemon juice, or ketchup! Test it out on a small area to make sure you get the result you are looking for. I find that for my copper pots, the best and fastest solution is anything tomato based, like tomato sauce, ketchup, tomato juice, etc. Sounds wierd, but it works like a charm.

      View Comment

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